Tag Archives: recipe

sprouted cookies = win!

24 Jan

Okay, so technically quick bread was the winner of my sprouted wheat poll, but after considering it I thought I’d take cookies for a spin with this first batch. I really wanted something that would bake for a shorter amount of time to really showcase the flavor of the flour. The fresh flour has a sweet grassy fragrance that I was worried would bake out of it.

Plus, I now have an excuse to sprout more flour and give it a go with bread. 🙂

Giddy-Up Janes

These cookies can easily be made with white whole wheat or an all-purpose flour rather than the sprouted wheat. They are a sweet oatmeal cookie with a kiss of peanut butter. Plus chocolate, they are nomtastic!

1 1/4 cup sprouted wheat flour (or white whole wheat or all-purpose)
1/2 teas. baking soda
1/4 teas. cinnamon
1/4 teas. salt
1/2 cup margarine, room temperature
1 cup organic granulated sugar
1/4 cup natural peanut butter
1/2 teas. vanilla
1 cup quick cooking oats
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking sheet with parchment.

In a small bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. In a large bowl cream together the margarine and sugar. Add the peanut butter and vanilla mix well. Add the flour mixture to the margarine mixture and mix until incorporated. Add the oatmeal in two batches, adding the chocolate chips with the second batch. The dough might be loose, but should be moist.

For dough into tablespoon sized balls and place on 2 inches apart on baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, until cookies puff up a bit and look golden. Let cool on cooling rack for 5 minutes before moving from baking sheet to finish cooling on rack.

Yields: 2 dozen cookies

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hello, 2011!

13 Jan

Wow, I’m finally getting to my first post of the new year. I can’t believe it’s 2011!

Every year I eager anticipate the holidays, to a bit of an extreme. I just love everything about the holiday time! The lights, the music, the food, family, wrapping presents… it’s just the best. Unfortunately, once the new year rolls around we’re just left with winter. Dreary, boring winter. Blah.

To counter the dark and the drizzle, here’s a healthy, hearty quick bread that is delicious and sure to perk up a wintery afternoon.

I’ve gotten really terrible with quinoa. Whenever I make it, there always seems to be some that’s left loitering around in my fridge with nothing to do. This quick bread uses some cooked quinoa to add protein and substance to this lightly-sweetened bread.



Cherry Almond Quinoa Bread

1 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup white whole wheat flour
1/2 cup organic sugar
1 1/2 teas. baking powder
1/2 teas. baking soda
1/4 teas. salt
1 1/2 cups cooked, cooled quinoa
1 cup plus 2 tbsp. milk of choice
1/3 cup mild oil
1/2 teas. almond extract (optional)
1/4 teas. vanilla extract (increase if not using almond)
1/2 cup chopped almonds
1/2 cup dried cherries
1/4 cup chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease and flour a standard sized loaf pan.

In a small bowl combine the flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In a large bowl, whisk together the quinoa, milk, oil and extracts. Add the dry ingredients to the wet in two batches until just mixed. Gently mix in the chopped almonds, cherries and chocolate chips.

Bake for 55-60 minutes until a toothpick comes out clean (no batter, but okay if crumbs stick to the toothpick). Let bread cool in pan, on a cooling rack, for 30 minutes before serving.

Yields: 10-12 slices

vegan fruitcake delight!

15 Dec

I couldn’t resist posting this fruitcake recipe. We never had fruitcake in my family when I was growing up, so I don’t have bad memories of it, but you can’t exist this time of year and not be familiar with the jokes that go along with fruitcake.

This fruitcake, however, is dense, moist and delicious and doesn’t take weeks to cure in the back of you pantry (yuck!). It’s quick and easy and can easily be adapted to meet your fruit cakey preferences (some darker sugar or alcohol, a spike of molasses, etc).

Ah, fruitcake. The butt of many a holiday joke. But no one will give you a hard time about this light cake, studded with dried fruit and nuts. They’ll be too busy stuffing their faces with it. This version is a bit less, um, brilliant than the traditional neon-candied cherries version, but you can feel free to substitute the dried fruit with those familiar favorites if you’d like. The added bonus is that these cakes don’t need to cure, so you don’t have to start working on them in October to enjoy their Yuletide cheer!

1 cup flour
2 tbsp. sugar
1/2 teas. baking powder
1/8 teas. salt
1/3 cup agave
1/2 cup orange juice OR 1/4 cup orange juice and 1/4 cup alcohol (rum or bandy) if going for the boozy taste
2 tbsp. apple sauce
2 tbsp. oil
1 teas. vanilla
1/2 cup chopped nuts of choice
1/2 cup chopped sweet dried fruit of choice (dates, figs, raisins, etc.)
1/2 cup chopped tart dried fruit of choice (apricots, candied orange peel, tart cherries, etc.)
1/3 cup alcohol (same as used in batter) or 1/3 cup apple cider

Preheat oven to 325. Lightly grease and flour 1 loaf pan or 4 mini loaf pans.

In a small bowl combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. In a medium sized bowl, combine the agave, orange juice, 1/4 cup alcohol (if using), applesauce, oil and vanilla. Whisk until combined. Add the dry to the wet in batches, until well combined. Add the nuts and dried fruit and mix until just combined. Spread the batter into the prepared pan(s). For mini cakes, bake for 24-28 minutes and for a full loaf for 45-50 minutes, until lightly golden and a toothpick comes out clean.

Remove cake from oven and set on rack. While warm, poke cake randomly with toothpick to create pin holes. Slowly and evenly pour the remaining alcohol or apple cider over the cakes, a little at at time to allow it time to absorb. Let cakes cool in pan for 20 minutes before inverting and let finish cooling on the rack.

Store cakes wrapped up or in a sealed container in fridge.

black friday fuel

25 Nov

Or lay-on-the-couch-and-watch-TV-all-day fuel. Or Tofurky-coma-hangover-need-energy-to-tolerate-family-I-only-see-this-time-of-year fuel. Whatevs. It works in any scenario.

While you worry about the food for today, let me worry about the food for tomorrow. Use some of the leftover elements of Thanksgiving that will be lurking in your fridge, destined to mold (ah, we all have such good intentions, don’t we?), and turn them into a hearty, delicious post-Thanksgiving breakfast. Creamy yet chewy steel cut oats join forces with that last little scrap of pumpkin puree, some spices and maple syrup to make an ultimate breakfast. And with leftover cranberries on top? Ooh yeah, that’s what I’m talkin’ ’bout.

T-Day Oats

Serves 2

2 cups water
1/2 cup steel cut oats
1/4- 1/3 cup pumpkin puree (depending on taste)
2 tbsp. maple syrup
1/8 teas. pumpkin pie spice
1/8 teas cinnamon
cranberry sauce (optional)

In a pot, bring the water to a boil. Add the oats and lower the temperature to a simmer. Let cook until oats absorb most of the water, about 15 minutes. Add the pumpkin puree, maple syrup and spices and mix well. Let cook until oatmeal is bubbly and cooked to desired consistency.

Serve with a drizzle of maple syrup and some cranberry sauce, if using.

rainy day cheer

18 Nov

I am a big fan of daylight savings so when we go off of it for the winter, it’s hard not to get a little sad. Here in the PacNW, it’s literally pitch black by 5 p.m. We’re in our rainy season, which means that even when it’s not raining we are in for primarily overcast days for several months to come. This isn’t a major complaint, so much as I’m setting the scene.

My dark commute home from work yesterday was accompanied by a torrential downpour. As I barreled alongside the other commuters, whose only goal was to get home in one piece, I began to daydream of a little bite of sunshine. Something bright and cheery to offset all of the heavy, pumpkin-laden treats we’ve been enjoying as of late. When I got home, I started pulling out ingredients only to discover that I had a scant amount of flour lingering in the bottom of the canister. I was in no mood to venture back out into the madness.

Time to improvise! Light and bright and requiring little flour… My mind wandered and landed on the deliciously simple clafoutis. In 100 Best, I have a clafoutis recipe that I love to whip up on a whim, as I always have silken tofu in my fridge and cherries in my freezer. Jim normally hates custardy things, but even he enjoys a slice. I decided to go with some little, single serving clafoutis with some frozen mixed berries.

If you haven’t had clafoutis before, you’re in for a real treat. These little morsels hold up well (great for noshing with one hand and typing with the other!), but remain tender and custard-like. If you’re afraid of baking with tofu, get over it already! You’re missing out! Also, you can make this with brown rice flour instead of the all-purpose and you’ve got clafoutis, gluten-free.

Une Bouchée de Clafoutis*

1 (12.3 oz.) container of firm silken tofu
1/2 cup organic sugar
3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
3/4 cup milk of choice
1 1/2 teas. baking powder
1 teas. vanilla
sprinkle salt
1 cup berries, thawed and drained
powdered sugar to dust

Preheat oven to 375. Lightly grease a 12 cup muffin tin.

In the bowl of a food processor combine the tofu and sugar and blend until mixed. Add the flour, milk, baking powder, vanilla and salt and mix until creamy and smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.

Fill each cup 2/3 of the way with batter. Sprinkle berries on top of each cup; do not mix.

Bake for 20 minutes, until clafoutis are puffy and lightly golden. Remove from oven and let cool completely before loosening with a butter knife and serving. Clafoutis is delicious warm, but will fall apart if you try to take them out too soon, so feel free to reheat in the microwave or toaster oven. Dust with powdered sugar before serving. Store leftovers covered, in the fridge.

Makes 12 servings.

*(Josiane, I’m relying on you to tell me if I butchered the title, I haven’t studied French in over 12 years!)

pumpkin overload? never!

3 Nov

First off, I want to plug a super cool new feature that WordPress is offering: FoodPress! It’s an easy way to sift and sort through the tons of food blogs hosted by WordPress and to see some cool features that might not otherwise cross your screen. Like you need another distraction.

I would love to know the fiscal impact of lost worker productivity due to Vegan MoFo. 🙂

Is it possible to eat too much pumpkin goodness this time of year? Never! One of the most popular recipes from 100 Best is, of course, one of the recipes with a typo in it. D’oh! Here it is, in all its corrected glory, for your autumn nomming pleasure.

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies

Always a favorite during the colder months, these cookies are very light and airy. The pumpkin adds a unique hue and a boost of beta carotene to each bite. That’s enough nutrition to convince me to have seconds!

2 cups flour
1 teaspoon. baking powder
1 teaspoon. baking soda
1 teaspoon. cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon. salt
1 cup margarine, softened
1/2 cup regular sugar
1/2 cup packed brown sugar, packed
1 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
2 teas. milk of choice
1 teaspoon. vanilla
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with with parchment paper.

In a small bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt ingredients. In a large bowl, beat cream sugar, brown sugars and margarine until creamed. Add pumpkin, milk and vanilla and mix well. Add dry ingredients to wet in two batches and mix until just mixed, then stir in chocolate chips.

Drop heaping tablespoons of dough 2 inches apart on a baking sheet 2 inches apart on cookie sheet. Bake for 10 to-12 minutes or until cookies are lightly browned on the edges. If you are baking more than one sheet at a time, switch their shelves halfway through. Let cookies cool on the baking sheet for 15 minutes, then remove from cookie sheet and cool on transfer cookies to cooling rack. Store cooled cookies in a container with a loose fitting lid, as they are very moist, at room temperature.

Yields: 3 dozen cookies

hagrid’s (not horrible) rock cakes

2 Nov

The following is a lesson that Harry Potter might have learned at Hogwarts. If they studied baking. And had baking related sex ed.

When a scone and a cookie love each other, sometimes they decide to have the seckts. In doing so, they create offspring: the rock cake.

Rock cakes are not common treats in the US, but are an old school tea time snack in the UK. They are made similarly to a scone, with a tinge more sweetness, and dropped into smaller rounds, making little, misshapen “rocks”, perfect for nibbling on during afternoon tea, after a typically terrible Potions lesson with Snape whilst commiserating with Hagrid. Unlike Hagrid’s truly rock-like cakes, these moist little treats are easy and delicious.

Chock full of yummy add-ins, these chocolaty rocks are worth donning your Invisibility Cape and dodging Filch (or in my house, the minions of Mrs. Norris) to sneak as a late night snack.

Hagrid’s (Not Horrible) Rock Cakes

1 1/2 cups flour
2 tbsp. baking cocoa, sifted
1 1/2 teas. baking powder
1/4 teas. salt
1/3 cup cold margarine
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup plus 3 tbsp. of milk of choice
1/8 teas. vinegar
1/4 teas. vanilla
1/3 cup chocolate chips
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
1/4 cup dried fruit (cherries, cranberries)

Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl combine the flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt. Combine well. Add the cold margarine, in chunks, and blend in until the mixture resembles a coarse meal. In a small bowl combine the milk, vinegar and vanilla. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix until just combined. Gently add in the chocolate chips, nuts and dried fruit.

Scoop dough into tablespoon sized balls onto prepared cookie sheet. Bake for 12-14 minutes, until cakes have risen and are set on the outside. Let cool on cooling rack for 10 minutes before transferring from baking sheet.

Makes 18 rock cakes